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Ottoman Turkish War Arrow, circa 17th C.

( ID: ma1278 )

A fine example of an Ottoman Turkish war arrow from the 17 to 18th c. Retaining the original armor-piercing iron tip and the thin wooden form likely made of pine, the feathers now somewhat tattered.

A rare survivor of a deeply important archery culture.  In an article from Journal of the Society of Archer-Antiquaries, volume 4, 1961 by Fred Isles, a number of unique elements of Turkish flight arrows were discussed which can be seen on this example. 

"It will be noticed that the shape of the Turkish nock -- with its narrow entrance that springs apart to admit the bow-string and then closes again -- enables an archer, even on horseback, to carry an arrow ready for use on the string of his bow.

The dark band of shading to be seen round the nock in Fig. 5c is a wrapping of fine thread-like sinew. This sinew, after being soaked in hot glue, was wound to a thickness of about 1/32 inch all over the nock, and it thus held the halves of the latter securely to the shaft.

So careful were the Turks in the construction of their arrows, that even the halves of their nocks were made from wood with a natural curve to suit the finished outline. It is possible, of course, they would not otherwise have withstood the violent shock of the released bowstring.

"It may be said that every inch in length of a Turkish bow or arrow was named in a manner that could be recognised or referred to. In a general way the parts of an arrow were known as follows: The enlarged centre, the 'stomach', from centre to point, the 'trowser', from centre to nock, the 'neck'."

Photo #1 of Ottoman Turkish War Arrow, circa 17th C.
Photo #2 of Ottoman Turkish War Arrow, circa 17th C.
Photo #3 of Ottoman Turkish War Arrow, circa 17th C.
Photo #4 of Ottoman Turkish War Arrow, circa 17th C.
Photo #5 of Ottoman Turkish War Arrow, circa 17th C.
Photo #6 of Ottoman Turkish War Arrow, circa 17th C.
Photo #7 of Ottoman Turkish War Arrow, circa 17th C.